Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Erythroneura rubrella - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger- note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- note head pattern
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A colorful species with a bluish-white body and a reddish color pattern. The two reddish-orange bands on the wings extending downwards from the thorax typically have sharp right angles on the inside, forming a bluish "box". The bluish pattern on the lower, middle half of the wings resembles the outline of an arrowhead when viewed from above, with an orange center. The mesonotum is pale, ranging in color from yellow to orange. The pronotum is largely orange, with a broad "M" shape extending across it; the rest of the pronotum is bluish. The top of the head has a yellowish-green to orange pattern with parallel submedial lines; the midline of the head however is orange to red, a key characteristic for this species. Adults are 2.7-3.0 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Transcontinental with most records in the eastern and central United States; also southern Canada (3I)
Abundance: Scattered records from several counties in the Piedmont where it can be locally common; likely more abundant across the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been recorded in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.
Plant Associates: Cornus pumila, C. stolonifera (Dogwood) (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: There are three species of Erythroneura that feed on dogwood and are very similar in appearance; this includes E. rubrella which is a vibrant red color, E. corni which has extensive red markings on the head (compared to E. rubrella, which has limited, less bold markings and has a brighter red color pattern), and E. ontari which has a less vibrant and bold color pattern. A fourth species that feeds on grape, E. rubra, is also very similar in appearance to E. rubrella and E. corni, though it has a pale midline on the top of the head. Due to the similarity between these four species, in some situations a species level identification may not be possible, or be a best guess at most.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Erythroneura rubrella No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood, open forest near lake edge
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: Caught seeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: very very small. Came to UV light. - unid_leafhopper