Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Ossiannilssonola berenice - No Common Name



© Paul Scharf- note 3 dark wing spots

© Paul Scharf- note color and pattern
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A mostly yellow species, with the head, pronotum, and scutellum a yellow to yellowish-orange color and the wings largely a light yellow to deep orange-yellow anterior to the apical crossveins. There is a transverse band of three black spots in a row in the apices of the inner three basal cells anterior to the crossveins of each wing. The apical cells are a smoky light brown color, sometimes with indistinct spots in the uppermost apical cells (cells three and four). Sometimes the black spots are reduced or missing. The abdomen has dorsal segments black medially, yellow to yellow-orange laterally and ventrally. Male subgenital plates are yellow. Adults are 3.25-3.5 mm long. (Christian, 1953)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and central North America
Abundance: Recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and mountains; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.
Plant Associates: Quercus alba, Quercus sp. (Christian, 1953)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: There are a number of Ossiannilssonola species with a row of 3 dark dots on an otherwise pale yellowish wing, including: antigone, quadrata, rossi, and knulli. However, O. berenice is the only one that has been recorded as far south as North Carolina (it is also supposedly the only member of this group that feeds on oaks). Northern species though could occur in the mountains, and other species could just have gone uncollected in the state. The non-collection records on this page are therefore tentative, but individuals found on an oak or in the Piedmont or Coastal Plain are more than likely to be O. berenice.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Ossiannilssonola berenice No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light. IAW Bugguide: There are 5 species like this, with only O. berenice recorded as far south as NC, but northern species are to be expected in the mountains
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light. IAW Bugguide: There are 5 species like this, with only O. berenice recorded as far south as NC, but northern species are to be expected in the mountains
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: several seen on sheet
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: