Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Homalodisca vitripennis - Glassy-winged Sharpshooter



© Aubrey Wiggins

© Ken Kneidel

© Mark Shields

© Paul Scharf- nymph
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Cicadellinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A large leafhopper, adults are 11-14 mm in length and have a large flattened head. This species has a blackish head and thorax with white spots, and the sides of the abdomen are a mixture of black and white patches. Wing veins are reddish to brown in color; the base half of the wings have "glassy" or transparent wing patches while the other half is dark in color with red, brown, and black patterns. The face and legs of adults are yellow-orange. The underside of the abdomen is speckled black and white, and the head and thorax are yellow. Nymphs shape-wise resemble the adults, especially the head; they have a grayish to brown body.
For additional pics of adults, see Glassy-winged Sharpshooter.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: A species found in the Southeast/southern U.S. and Mexico. It has been introduced into the Southwest where it has become a serious threat to viticulture. BG
Abundance: Uncommon to locally common, recorded from a handful of counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; probably more abundant in the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in grassy/brushy areas during much of the year, and hibernates in the forests during winter months.
Plant Associates: This species feeds on the xylem, the water conducting tissue, of herbaceous and woody plants. It has been known to feed on more than 100 plant species; preferred plants depend on the season and locality, but typically include crape myrtle, citrus, oak, Vitis, Hibiscus, and holly. GWSS
Behavior: This species peaks in number during the summer months, with population declines starting around late August as Fall approaches. Before winter, adults migrate into forests and undergo incomplete hibernation until spring. Mating occurs in the spring and summer (GWSS). Glassy-winged sharpshooters tend to feed on last-year's growth and meristematic growth, excreting large amounts of liquid as they feed. They ingest 100 to 300 times their dry body weight in xylem fluid per day and in large populations their high volume of excreta ("leafhopper rain") can become a problem, leaving white residue on leaves (GWSS).
Comment: This species is a major vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa,which causes a variety of plant diseases such as phony peach disease and Pierce's disease on grape. It has become a serious threat to viticulture in the southwest, especially California, where it has been introduced. GWSS
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Homalodisca vitripennis Glassy-winged Sharpshooter

Photo by:
Out of state Co.
Comment: Nymph, Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Weedy area near a trees.
Photo by: aubrey wiggins
Wake Co.
Comment: Glassy-winged Sharpshooter
Photo by: aubrey wiggins
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: aubrey wiggins
Wake Co.
Comment: Glassy-winged Sharpshooter
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
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Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
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Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Amber Sauder
Harnett Co.
Comment: unid_leafhopper
Photo by: Mark Shields
Dare Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Mark Shields
Dare Co.
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