Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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Thionia quinquata - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph, note head length

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph, note length of nose
Taxonomy
Family: ISSIDAESubfamily: Issinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A uniformly brown species, with small fine black points all over the body. The prominent wing venation and the claws are also black. The vertex of the head is narrow, with the lateral margins diverging; this gives the vertex, which is relatively flat on the top without any pronounced margins, more of a chevron-like shape than other species in the genus (BG). This subtle but important field mark can be useful in differentiating from the similar T. bullata. Adults, at least females, are large for this genus, being 8 mm long from tip of the head to apex of the wings (T. quinquata). See here for images of an adult female: lateral, dorsal, and frontal. Nymphs are greenish with orange transverse stripes down the back and an orange margin to the head. The head length itself is distinctive, as the head noticeably extends past the eyes, converging to form a triangle when viewed from above.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Southeastern United States, with specimens from North Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia; rare.
Abundance: Uncommon to rare, or rarely collected, has been recorded in a few counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed hardwood forest and pine forest.
Plant Associates: Pines, though has also been recorded from oak and sweetgum (probably was resting on these trees).
Behavior:
Comment: Further studies need to be done to clearly associate nymphs with adults; rearing some of these long-nosed nymphs would be extremely helpful.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Thionia quinquata No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Vance Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest edge near grassy areas
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Vance Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest edge near grassy areas
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Vance Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest edge near grassy areas
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation; notice how far the nose juts out (compared to T. simplex)
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation; notice how far the nose juts out (compared to T. simplex)
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills (pine forest) habitat with lots of shrubby vegetation; notice how far the nose juts out (compared to T. simplex)
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest; nymphs
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat and mixed hardwood, cypress forest; nymphs
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: captured during sweep of low vegetation bordering athletic field
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: captured during sweep of low vegetation bordering athletic field
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: captured during sweep of low vegetation bordering athletic field