Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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FULGORIDAE Members: NC Records

Calyptoproctus marmoratus - No Common Name



© Stan Gillam- note coloration

© J. Allen Ratzlaff

© Tony DeSantis- note wing pattern

© J. Allen Ratzlaff
Taxonomy
Family: FULGORIDAESubfamily: Poiocerinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: This species is variable in color, with the body and anterior portions of the wings usually mottled with lichen-green, brown, and black coloration. The wings are reticulated with darker veins surrounding translucent wing cells; the base of the wings can show the lichen green and black color pattern found on the thorax. The head is not strongly produced, being rather flat with eyes narrower than the pronotum. The sides of the face are parallel, and the legs are relatively long, especially the hind legs. Adults are about one inch in length and resemble small flattened cicadas. (BG)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States, from Virginia south to Florida and west to eastern Texas and Oklahoma (BG).
Abundance: Uncommon, scattered records across the state but not encountered frequently; uncommon to rare.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in deciduous forests.
Plant Associates: Unknown, but likely deciduous trees, possibly oaks such as Quercus nigra. (BG)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: See here for more images of a pinned adult.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Calyptoproctus marmoratus No Common Name

Photo by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
Comment: Found at moth sheet
Photo by: J. Allen Ratzlaff
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: J. Allen Ratzlaff
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: It landed on the moth sheet and ran up the sheet and left. Barely got a photo. It was big over 1/2 inch long, at first I thought it was a big fly! - unid_planthopper
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Durham Co.
Comment: ENRI
Photo by: Stan Gillam
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Stan Gillam
Guilford Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Stan Gillam
Guilford Co.
Comment: