Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Muirodelphax atralabis - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- female; note the long wings

© Kyle Kittelberger- female
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: Delphacinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: An orange species. Males have a reddish-orange abdomen that contrasts with the light brown thorax and head. There is a black spot on each side of the thorax, and the frons is completely unmarked. Females are orange and lack any marks. Note that brachypterous females have relatively long wings compared to other Muirodelphax. This species closely resembles M. arvensis, but males of atralabis lack the black marks on the scutellum and atralabis is noticeably smaller as well. (UDEL)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States (UDEL)
Abundance: Somewhat common, mostly found in the mountains but has been recorded in the Piedmont. Likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy, brushy areas
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment:
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Muirodelphax atralabis No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm; female