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DELPHACIDAE Members: NC Records

Metadelphax propinqua - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note face color

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger
Taxonomy
Family: DELPHACIDAESubfamily: DelphacinaeSynonym: Toya propinqua
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A highly variable species in which short (brachypter) and long-winged (macropter) forms are common. Adult macropterous males are around 3.29 mm long, while brachypters are around 1.97 mm; macropter females are around 3.37 mm and brachypters are on average around 2.35 mm. Adults are generally yellowish tan to brownish in color, and the face is embrowned with pale/white ridges and darker borders to the embrowned parts. The two antennal segments are pale with dark margins apically on segment I and basally on segment II. The pronotum is concolorous with the rest of the body, and the wings can be slightly fuscous. Brachypterous individuals tend to be paler than macropters. This species closely resembles M. wetmorei and Toya idonea. However, M. wetmorei is described as consistently exhibiting dark intercarinal regions compared to propinqua which has embrowned regions with dark borders on the frons: the frons in wetmorei is completely dark with white ridges, while it is brown with a black border and white ridges in propinqua. Furthermore, wetmorei tends to have a dark clypeus (lower part of the face), whereas propinqua's clypeus is pale. These features are compounded by the fact that variation occurs in the two species with regards to the face and should not be used as a definitive distinguishing feature. However, while propinqua tends to have pale antennal segments, there is a dark brown ring around the juncture of the two segments in wetmorei. T. idonea resembles both species but has a darkened face like in wetmorei and pale antennal segments like in propinqua. It is helpful to photograph the face of individuals that may represent one of these three species, but in some cases an ID may not be possible. For images of pinned specimens from these three closely related species, see: propinqua, wetmorei, and idonea. For more information about these three species and species-specific characteristics, see: G & B 2007.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Cosmopolitan (found everywhere), especially in tropics and warm temperate regions; from Argentina to Canada, South Africa to Europe and central Asia. Adventive to the New World, first recorded in North America in California around 1880. (UDEL), (BG)
Abundance: Common, recorded throughout the state, especially from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy areas.
Plant Associates: Reported on about 15 grass species, including sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), maize (Zea mays), and rice (Oryza sativa). (UDEL) Metadelphax propinqua reaches high population levels on Bermuda grass.
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is known to transmit Cynodon chlorotic streak nucleorhabdovirus in corn and bermudagrass, Maize rough dwarf virus, and barley yellow striate mosaic cytorhabdovirus. (UDEL)
Status: Introduced
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Metadelphax propinqua No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood, open forest near lake edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Carteret Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Carteret Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Carteret Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Carteret Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated;
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated;
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated;
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated;
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated; 2 specimens photographed
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: open woodlands, pine dominated; 2 specimens photographed
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Wet area with cattails and goldenrod.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Wet area with cattails and goldenrod.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Open area near woods. Attracted to black light.