Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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ACHILIDAE Members: NC Records

Catonia picta - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- underside view
Taxonomy
Family: ACHILIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A very colorful and distinctive hopper with reddish-brown to orange wings with a prominent grayish-white transverse band; the thorax and head are a vibrant reddish color. The underside of the body is orange-brown, as are the legs. The face is tricolored and distinctive, with the top black, followed by a white band, then black and orange-brown and finally another white band; the clypeus is a pale orange color. Adults are 4.4-5.8 mm long. (O'Brien, 1971)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States: Atlantic and Gulf Coast states (UDEL)
Abundance: An uncommon species that can be locally abundant in some areas; recorded from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.
Plant Associates: Pinus sp. (UDEL); also reported from oak-hickory.
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is most similar to Catonia pini and could be easily confused. Both species have similarly colored wings, but in picta there is a broad central transverse grayish-white band; in pini, this band is instead pale brown. Additionally, there is a lot more variation in the coloration of the wing in pini than picta, with the latter primarily being reddish-brown and grayish-white while the former is a mixture of various browns, black and grayish-white. Additionally, the facial pattern in the two species is quite different: in picta, the frons is black and rufous-brown with a white band, whereas in pini the face is brown with a white band.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Catonia picta No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: On Sheet in early morning. Second individual on sheet 2200 on 2013/08/09
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: On Sheet in early morning. Second individual on sheet 2200 on 2013/08/09
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood, open forest near lake edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood, open forest near lake edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood, open forest near lake edge
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond