Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CLASTOPTERIDAE Members: NC Records

Clastoptera testacea - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male; note pale face

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- note pale face
Taxonomy
Family: CLASTOPTERIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A sexually dimorphic species with yellow legs. Males typically have a blackish body with pale, tan stripes running across the upper pronotum and head. There is a pale patch on the outer edge of otherwise blackish wings, and the extent of the white on the pronotum can vary among individuals. All males have a pale yellowish face without any transverse bands. Females are a light brown to reddish brown color with a reddish scutellum and pale face; there is also a small black spot on the lower back corner of each wing. Females are most similar to female Sunflower Spittlebugs, but notice the overall color difference: C. testacea females have more of a uniform reddish or light brown body color. Males are 3.1-3.8 mm long, while females are slightly larger at 4.4-5.2 mm long (BG). Nymphs are a light brownish color.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Found from eastern Canada south to North Carolina (BG).
Abundance: An uncommon species with records across the mountains and Piedmont. Probably more common across the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in mixed oak-pine woodlands (BG), as well as grassy, field-type habitats on forest edge
Plant Associates: Feeds on oaks (Quercus) and pines (Pinus) (BG)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment:
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Clastoptera testacea No Common Name

Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Stokes Co.
Comment: HARO
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy, and forested habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy, and forested habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Ashe Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Surry Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: All Males attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: All Males attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: All Males attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: All Males attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV and Black Lights
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV and Black Lights
Photo by: North Carolina State University Insect Collection
Wilkes Co.
Comment: male, collected
Photo by: North Carolina State University Insect Collection
Wilkes Co.
Comment: male, collected
Photo by: North Carolina State University Insect Collection
Wilkes Co.
Comment: male, collected
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: attracted at night with a light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: attracted at night with a light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: attracted at night with a light