Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Cyrtolobus vau - No Common Name



© Matthew S. Wallace- male

© Paul Scharf- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- male
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: Smiliinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A small robust species with a noticeable crest on the pronotum (lower on males) and prominent markings. This species varies greatly in color and size, with females larger and lighter than males. The transverse pronotal band is prominent, pale bordered with a deep brown in females, whereas the lateral stripe is lacking. Females have a distinct light brown coloration, with the pronotum elevated slightly behind the head. The female's forewings are hyaline with brownish wing tips. The head is small, pale yellow punctured with brown. The eyes are large and grayish-brown, ranging to red in males; the oceeli are small and hairy. The legs and undersurface of the body are a uniform yellowish color. Males are similar to females but are blackish overall, with prominent white transverse bands. In both sexes the mid-dorsal spot is large and prominent. Adults are between 5.5 and 6.5 mm long. (Kopp)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Fairly abundant in eastern and central North America, as far west as the Rocky Mountains (Kopp)
Abundance: Seasonal distribution: late March-5 September (CTNC)
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in a wide variety of habitats where oak is present, including mixed hardwood forest.
Plant Associates: Quercus alba, Q. prinus, Q. stellata (CTNC)
Behavior: To listen to the male courtship call for this genus, listen here. These courtship calls are not audible to the human ear, and the calls here are produced by recording the substrate vibrations that the treehoppers use to communicate through the plants themselves. The recorded call is then amplified so that it is now audible to human ears. Research has shown that treehoppers use vibrations to attract mates, to announce the discovery of a good feeding site, or to alert a defending mother to the approach of a predator (T.IM).
Comment: Can be attracted at night with a light. C. vau usually overwinter in the egg stage, though adults can hibernate in leaf litter. The average egg clump contains 3 eggs, and eggs laid in the fall hatch in the spring, with individuals reaching maturity by the end of the following June. Nymphs are also typically attended by ants. The nymphal period of each instar is roughly 10, 6, 5, 10, and 14 days, respectively. Mating occurs a few days after the last moult and oviposition begins during the same week. Males have also typically been found to be more abundant than females in previous studies. (Kopp)
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:
See also Habitat Account for General Oak-Hickory-Maple Forests

Species Photo Gallery for Cyrtolobus vau No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood habitat; a very common white oak group specialist. Female
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Female, Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Surry Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat near forest edge & forest
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Female, Attracted to light
Photo by: Brian Bockhahn
Gates Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: i hope this is the right ID?
Photo by: Matthew S. Wallace
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Durham Co.
Comment: Female, Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Durham Co.
Comment: Female, Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Stokes Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Gates Co.
Comment: collected by B. Bockhahn; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Gates Co.
Comment: collected by B. Bockhahn; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Gates Co.
Comment: collected by B. Bockhahn; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Gates Co.
Comment: collected by B. Bockhahn; males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Gates Co.
Comment: collected by B. Bockhahn; males
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: UV light
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: kept landing on my arm, camera and phone. UV lights
Photo by: Bo Sullivan
Carteret Co.
Comment: female 5.4 mm, photographed by K. Kittelberger; collected at UV trap
Photo by: Steve Hall
Orange Co.
Comment: on moth sheet